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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 146 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the nsa had actually caused inconvenience, damage, harm to un-american. i have not seen that story yet. wasve not seen a person who wrongfully identified to be a terrorist, was thrown in jail, given the fifth degree, and so on. there has been more inconvenience and damage to americans by the no-fly list and by taking shoes off in an airport then buy this program, which is precisely pointed toward finding people who pose threats to the united states, see who they are talking to, follow them up under court supervision to identify threats. stuff, this is potential we do not trust the government having information stuff. it is not real harm caused to real people by activities which are causing no good. >> i am not going to debate this, because i am not supposed to be the debater appear. but i am going to play devils advocate with you you. let us put it that way. i will take full accountability for that for our audience here and on the webcast. there are two things i would push you on. one is, how would you know if anyone had been harmed by abuse, given that the program is as secret as it i
. and later, nsa data collection. >> tomorrow night on the encore presentation of "first ladies" -- >> you would be invited into the dining room for the drawing room. dolly madison would have an unusual setting for the period and sit at the head of the table. her husband would sit at the center of the table. dollywood correct -- direct the conversation -- dolly would correct -- direct the conversation. there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. sheuld not be unusual. considered the dining to be more relaxing than entertaining in washington. >> the encore presentation of our series "first ladies." >> when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your phone calls. that is not what this program is about. as was indicated, what the intelligence community is doing is looking at phone numbers, durations of calls. they are not looking at people's names and they're not looking at content. >> these programs are controversial. we understand that. they are sensitive. they are also important. they allow us to have the ability to gather this chatter that i referred to. if
, the nsa came underfire in the senate judiciary committee, republicans and democrats raising serious questions about the big phone spying program of nsa. we'll bring you up to date on that and a whole lot more right here on current tv. (vo) current tv gets the conversation started weekdays at 9 eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. (vo) sharp tongue. >>excuse me? (vo) quick wit. >> and yes, president obama does smell like cookies and freedom. (vo) and above all, opinion and attitude. >> really?! this is the kind of they just pulled freshly from their [bleep]. >> you know what those people are like. >> what could possibly go wrong in eight years of george bush? >> my producer just coughed up a hairball. >>sorry. >>just be grateful current tv doesn't come in "smell-o-vision" >> oh come on! the sweatshirt is nice and all, but i could use a golden lasso. (vo)only on current tv. cenk off air>>> alright in 15 minutes we're going to
government. what is the significance of these documents that have been released by the nsa? >> well, the court essentially was very angry at the government, because he said you've been collecting all this data on americans which have nothing to do with terrorism, completely domestic. the nsa is supposed to be focused on foreign communications. you've been misrepresenting what you've been doing to the court for three years, essentially. the nsa was essentially sending its machines, the computers that it was collecting its stuff that essentially -- you communicating with someone in al qaeda, yemen, for instance, completely your do mistic communications with other people. >> in this country? >> in this country it's not necessarily the content. it was taking care -- and it wasn't doing that. >> this went on for three years? >> for tli years. october 2011, the nsa finally comes to the judge and explains what they've been doing. the judge was very angry and said, well, you know, tell us how you're going to fix this. the nsa had to come up with new ways to remove the domestic data. >> and
in the wake of the nsa surveillance revelations. things are going down a little differently in great britain. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has that story tonight. >> reporter: the guardian's editor says british authorities demanded edward snowden's material provided to them or destroyed, but the paper facing legal action if it didn't comply. hard files were destroyed under supervision, but other copies exist. >> they threatened us with strength, go to get all this material back and stop us writing about it. that's not something that would be possible in the united states. >> reporter: the new nsa controversy plays out as president obama's traditional supporters on the left are openly criticizing his administration. >> i think the white house lost credibility. >> reporter: aclu alleges they play word games, citing a document known as the intelligence directive. collecting data does not mean storing data in the traditional sense but rather retrieving and analyzing it. >> it has a bizarre definition to allow the nsa to obscure what's going on, even though they're saying a
on this coming. plus, what you can write in an email that will pretty much guarantee that the nsa will read it. and how would you like to have a comedian performing on your next flight? or maybe a singer belting out a tune in the aisle? the airline that plans to have performers on its planes. that's coming up as we approach the bottom of the hour and the top of the news. mom always got good nutrition to taste great. she was a picky eater. we now i'm her dietitian... ...anlast year, she wasn'tating so well. so i recommended boost complete nutritional drink to help her get the nutrition she was missing. and now she drinks it every day. well, it tastes great! [ male announcer ] boost drink has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones, and 10 grams of protein to help maintain muscle. and now boost comes in two delicious, new bars. look for them next to boost drinks. [ dietitian ] now, nothing keeps mom from doing what she loves... ...being my mom. little things anyone can do. it steals your memories. your independence. ensures support, a breakthro
. >>> coming up, the secrets we keep and the nsa debate. hey linda! what are you guys doing? having some fiber! with new phillips' fiber good gummies. they're fruity delicious! just two gummies have 4 grams of fiber! to help support regularity! i want some... [ woman ] hop on over! [ marge ] fiber the fun way, from phillips'. but you had to leave rightce to now, would you go? world, [ woman ] hop on over! man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. >>> the news broke just after 10:00 this morninging that army private first class bradley manning has been sentenced to a maximum of 35 years for giving hundreds of thousands of documents to wikileaks. it wasn't long before support 0ers made the claim his sentence is exactly why edward snowden,
is i have for us in washington. catherine, what is the reaction from the nsa? >> reporter: heather, the nsa is pushing back against "the wall street journal" story this morning though officials do not point to a specific claim other than saying the figure of 75% is overly broad. in a statement to fox news a nsa spokesperson says quote, nsa signals intelligence mission is centered on defeating foreign adversaries who are aiming to harm the country. we defend against threats and working to protect privacy rights of u.s. persons. it is not either/or. it is both. the use of the devices that allow the agency to pull data in real time as it passes through web networks. the in. sa's definition of collection relies on an intelligence directive which defines collection as analyzing retrieving information, not actually storing it, heather. heather: catherine, where does it leave the administration? >> reporter: in his most recent comments on the ns aft controversy president obama said more americans learn about the nsa programs and safeguards built into the programs he believes the more comf
has information on the nsa spying scandal we were talking about. you want to stick around for that. >>> which one of us five has the messiest office? the producers took snapshots today. you're going to find out. it is not mine. we're taking a fun trip back in time later, hope you'll join us. we'll be back in a minute. [ male announcer ] want healthy joints?° ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. the best stuff in the joint.™ she loves a lot of it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms obph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask you
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
there, chris lavoie, jim ward. before we -- lots of big news obviously, nsa, all of that stuff. however, more importantly, nancy in ohio says omg, thanks to listening to a steph cast, only $4.95 a month, and then taking a shower that sound of trying to get the last drops of shampoo out of my bottle will never sound the same. it sounds exactly like turtle sex. eh, eh. >> stephanie: you don't want to wait. just that last little -- i apologize for that. [ applause ] >> wow! >> stephanie: all right. >> she thought of this when she was in the shower. >> it sounded like someone else's faucet? >> stephanie: right. the guy didn't repair his faucet correctly. that's how it sounds when he needs water. all right. in the meantime, because we should just start monday, we should start the week with some weirdness. >> yeah? >> stephanie: rocky mountain mike for some reason has decided to combine turtle sex, dana loesch, cody the screaming dog and barry white. why not? >> because he can. ♪ >> stephanie: that's weird. [dana loesch screaming] >> wow. >> like having sex with mitch mcconnell. >> stephani
. >> critics are refuting many claims the obama administration made by the nsa data collection program. that is leaving many worried about the security of their personal information and wondering whether or not the agency is playing by the rules. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has more now from washington. hi, catherine. have we reach ad tipping. >> reporter: patti ann, according to aclu at least 20 pieces of legislation are being considered to modify the nsa program adding the white house continues to disappoint its base on the issue. >> i think the white house has lost credibility and i think the government generally has been operating with a deficit of trust in the area of surveillance for the past few years. they have been saying one thing publicly to congress and to the courts and turns out that quite another thing has been taking place behind closed doors. >> reporter: in the end the aclu alleges that the nsa plays word games under the set of rules known as the united states intelligence directive 18, collecting data only applies when the data is analyzed and
with you. and no warrant is required. nsa official says: nsa signals intelligence activities? are designed to acquire, produce, and disseminate foreign intelligence information net capables and intentions or activities of foreign powers and their agents, foreign organizations, foreign persons, blah blah blah. and any immix indication that nsa's collection is arbitrary and unconstrained is dead wrong. >> how chose to white house justify this. >> the president's spy agencies are not just interested in communication to and from a terror target. they're interested in information about the target. so when that comes up in an e-mail send from an american to someone overseas it's fair game to symptom but it has to cross the border. it can't be an e-mail to someone else inside the country. "the new york times" says that nsa computers search nearly all cross-border text data for dewords and save e-mail or instant mess imagines so analysts can examine them. jay carny says anything not related to an investigation is deleted. >> the purpose of the program is to investigate and potentially prevent terr
u.s. officials that tlebl that the nsa surveillance programs helped track this emerging threat. the president announced some reforms on friday in those programs. and had tough words for the nsa leaker edward snowden, said he was not a patriot. take a look. >> mr. snowden's been charged with three felonies. if he believes what he did was right, then like every american citizen, he can come here, appear before the court with a lawyer, and make his case. >> so, what have you been able to learn about what u.s. officials are trying to do to get snowden right now? >> some officials i've talked to wish that a deal could be struck to bring him back to the u.s. make no mistake. one official said he has done irrefutable damage. the more the terrorists know how we can monitor them, the less we will be able to. that's the single most important asset we have. some officials say we don't know all of what he has, we don't want him in the hands of the russians. whatever message it would send, he's gotten the president of the united states to make some changes. but the justice department has gi
substantials and the n.s.a. and the i.r.s. and suddenly we get this alert that something could be happening in the arab world somewhere toward western interests, and it is pro-administration. we've heard this a million times. judge, i'm with you on this. it does look like -- >>gretchen: what if something huge does happen? i think we should keep our eye on the prize. >>steve: just that they would reveal such detail. they burned a source and a method, and that's the problem. they could still say be careful if you're in these areas. but to be so specific to make it look like the administration is working overtime, look at these fantastic avenues of intel, that is troubling. >> another scandal on a lesser scale the republican national committee is threatening to blackball nbc and cnn from the republican presidential debates if the networks don't scratch their pro-hillary clinton films. i mean, what kind of sense does this make for nbc and cbs -- >>gretchen: cnn. >> thank you. to be publishing films about hillary clinton. could you imagine if fox published one about mitt romney or george w. bush
-line date. n.s.a. employees using their eavesdropping powers to spy on love interests. this morning we have the best n.s.a. pickup lines to share with you like this one. hey, baby, come here often? of course you do. we've been tracking you. "fox & friends" starts now. ♪ ♪ >> this is andrew dice clay. you're watching "fox & friends." oh! >>brian: big come-back in woody allen's movie. andrew dice clay. you been following his career? >>anna: no, i haven't. >>steve: he hasn't had one in years. >>brian: he took time off to raise his children. >>steve: good morning everybody. thanks so much. wait until you see this stuff. if you missed the mtv music awards last night, the video will have you talking. >>anna: she stole the show, miley cyrus. okay, we get it. you're not hannah montana anymore. >>steve: there's alan thicke. >>anna: robin thicke. >>steve: alan thicke's son. >>anna: what is she doing with the finger? >>steve: we're number one. thanks to all of you watching. let's get to a fox news alert. despite the alleged chemical attack in syria, the u.s. is edging closer to a military response
gamut. andas been counsel to nsa acting assistant director for national security and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor's michael leiter. he was the second director of the counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counsel to the ceo of data analytics company. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. with a very begin is, whatstion and that is the current state of the threat from terrorism? were does the emulate from and how serious is it? what do we start with it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it every would've talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. topuld say right off of the the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11. the group is really struggling to survive to recruit and train and operate. -- it remains at the vanguard of the movement. is still looks to for leadership
the nsa, coverage of the nsa program or to kind of obscure human intelligence, assets, and saying it was signals intelligence? >> sure, first to fran's point it's totally true this is one of many and one piece of information in a broad collection that the u.s. intelligence community has engaged in. this meeting was significant according to officials and reports in both "the new york times" and lots of other outlets because it was where the vague discussion of inpending attack was discussed and if you look at the embassy closings around the world it matches the people on the call. so you can sort of understand why the u.s. government took such a broad approach. as for it being motivations in taking the risk, i can't speak to that. some of them they take risks on. as far as some of the other reporters linking this to the nsa and know den and what have you, it's important to point out the programs disclosed by snowden are not related to this particular communication particularly intercepted. they are about collecting information, domestically and it's not really connected. so i think
were using you to either justify the nsa coverage of the nsa program or to kind of obscure human intelligence, assets and saying it was signals intelligence. >> sure. first to fran's point. it is true it is one of many threat streams and one piece of information in a broad mosaic of a collection that the u.s. intelligence community is engaged in on a regular basis but the meeting was significant according to officials and reports in the "new york times" mcclatchy and other outlets because it is where the vague discussion of impending attack was discussed. if you look at the embassy closings around this world it largely matches the people who were on the call according to to our reporting. you can understand why the u.s. government took a broad brush aproechl as for it being their motivations in taking the risk, i can't speak to that. i would say some communications they hold closely. some they take risk on. this seems to be a risk they didn't take as far as other reporters linking it to the nsa and snowden and what have you. it is important to point out the programs disclosed by
nsa documents. this past sunday miranda was detained by authorities in heathrow airport, returning from a trip in berlin where he met up with greenwald's clab raollabor laura poitras. he had his laptop confiscated, a mobile phone, smartdisk and video game console. he was held for seven hours under the terrorism act of 2000. asked about his association with greenwald and "the guardian's" reporting. miranda's lawyers are threatening legal action over what they and others are calling his, quote, unlawful detention. british government defended its decision to detain miranda in a statement today saying it was their right to stop anyone suspected of carrying "highly sensitive stolen information that would help terrorism." when u.s. officials were asked about the incident, they said they got a heads-up the london police were going to detain miranda but insisted they had nothing to do with it saying "this was a decision made by the british government without the government and not the request of the united states government." the editor of "the guardian" recounted yesterday a series of abs
suspects. he says it's a response to last week's "the washington post" report that the nsa broke the law or privacy rules thousands of times per year for the past five years. the "the washington post" reports that's according to an nsa audit that the paper got a former intelligence contractor named ed snowden. the post reports most of the violations involved unauthorized surveillance of americans or foreigners here in the united states. last week an nsa official says it always gets to the bottom of any mistakes it made. now there is word british documents demanded from another newspaper who broke the news of the snowden leaks. catherine herridge is live in our d.c. newsroom to pick up the story from there. catherine? >> shep, the guardian senator says british authorities wanted the nsa documents handed over or destroyed with the paper facing legal action if it didn't cooperate. hard drives were then destroyed under the supervision of british authorities with this photo posted on the newspaper's web site but other copies exist. they threatened us with restraint they were going to get all
in the -- matt here.matth ols olson is the current director of ct. nt foras been general counsel the nsa, acting assistant attorney general for national security, and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor at the end ctc -- the nctc is mike leiter. he was the second director of the national counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counselor to the ceo of the data analytics alantir technologies. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. why don't we begin with a very ,road question, and that is what is the current state of the threat from terrorism? where does it emanate from and how serious is it? why don't we start with you? >> it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it. we have talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. i would say right off of the top the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11.
in 3 minutes. >> nsa leaker edward snowden granted temporary asylum today. how long he will be able to stay in russia. the one important decision students make that may determine their success in college. >>> complete bay area news coverage continues right now, this is ktvu channel 2 news at 5:00 p.m. >>> back now live to frank ogawa plaza in downtown oakland at 14 14th and broadway where the bart rally continues to grow in support of union workers for bart. they could go on strike sunday night if they can't reach an agreement. the two sides did talk today but still no deal. news chopper 2 is live over the crowd right now. you can see it continues to grow. probably in the neighborhood of 200, maybe more people on hand right now. ktvu's paul chambers is also at the rally. paul? >> reporter: i would say 3-400 people right now. i have a better view from the ground. there are people talking. there are tons of different unions out here. you have longshoreman, nurses. they say they are standing united for a fair contract. bart people say it is not about wages and benefits, it is about saf
that tlebl that the nsa surveillance programs helped track this emerging threat. the president announced some reforms on friday in those programs. and had tough words for the nsa leaker edward snowden, said he was not a patriot. take a look. >> mr. snowden's been charged with three felonies. if he believes what he did was right, then like every american citizen, he can come here, appear before the court with a lawyer, and make his case. >> so, what have you been able to learn about what u.s. officials are trying to do to get snowden right now? >> some officials i've talked to wish that a deal could be struck to bring him back to the u.s. make no mistake. one official said he has done irrefutable damage. the more the terrorists know how we can monitor them, the less we will be able to. that's the single most important asset we have. some officials say we don't know all of what he has, we don't want him in the hands of the russians. whatever message it would send, he's gotten the president of the united states to make some changes. but the justice department has given no indication a deal is in
satellite corp. 2013] now to the u.s. and its surveillance program by the nsa. overstepped its legal authority when it was doing unauthorized surveillance of americans and foreign targets. patrick leahy announced on friday that he wanted to hold another hearing on the nsa. we talked to another reporter about it. >> we are joined by jennifer martinez on the hill. why is patrick leahy calling for another hearing on the nsa? >> there was another report published by the washington post late thursday. broken had repeatedly promises rules and overstepped its authority. came out with a statement saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the nsa and that they hope to hold another hearing when congress returns to get answers. >> how bad was the report the washington post published on thursday? >> it is definitely pretty damning. it puts the administration in a worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the statement that the president made that the press conference and at the white house and other sta
to defend weeks later why the nsa program has expanded so much pain when you want to get the allies outside saying he essential as we stand firm against the islamic terrorism after the president says the war is almost over. and being in congress, i support the nsa program. we went through the nuances and the details. but apart from that or maybe in congress and apart from a better america, you know, blame america first crowd that may be in congress i think one of the main reasons why we have a hard time maintaining support for the programs such as the nsa is because the president has undercut us and manly speaks in a schizophrenic way. he should be the one out there on national television. he should be the one out there instead of talking about phony scandals he should be talking about the phony speeches that he's made about islamic terrorism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. [applause] so we are really against a situation where the people are being considered, republicans and some conservatives are defending a program of the left-of-center president refuses to defend himself
is opening an investigation into nsa surveillance programs. the former jp morgan trader known as the "london whale" may be off the hook. reports say bruno iksil is not likely to face charges related to bad trading bets that racked up more than $6 billion in losses for jp morgan chase. iksil is called the london whale because he was based in jp morgan's london office and put on monster-sized trading positions. the justice deparmtment and sec are still investigating the bank, but the whale trader is said to no longer be the focus. things are looking up in the u.s. according to bruce flatt. he's the ceo of brookfield asset management and is often refered to as the warren buffett of canada. brookfield already has $100 billion in u.s. assets, and flatt tells cnbc there continues to be a lot of investment opportunity in america. flatt says he's bullish on the u.s. because housing, retail and manufacturing are all making a comeback, and he sees possibilities in the shale gas revolution. flatt also mentioned he's looking for value plays in europe and emerging markets. it's always fascinating to know
details on how much the nsa is watching you online. >> the senseless shooting of an athlete in oklahoma sparks outrage in two countries. charlie talks tennis with defending u.s. open champ andy murray. can the brit make it two in a row? >> we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener. your world in 90 seconds. >> the report coming from the syrian rebels. scores upon scores of people have been killed. >> new claims of chemical weapons in syria. >> opposition leaders are saying that between 600 and 1,000 people were killed. the assad regime told television there is no truth whatsoever in the claim. >> this most certainly is a dreadful tragedy of epic proportions. >> a gunman opened fire at an elementary school just outside atlanta. >> hundreds of panics children then ran for safety. >> it's a good day, all of our children are safe. >> michael brandon hill exchanged fire with law enforcement before giving himself up. >> at the end of the day, all you want is your child to come home safe. >> nearly 50 major fires are burning in 11 western states. meant
got there. telling us what exactly the nsa does might be a nice next step, you guys. >>> good tuesday morning. right now on "first look," the west continues to be a tinderbox as crews battle on. >>> caroline kennedy's personal financial records released for the first time. >>> james dimaggio leaves life insurance money to hannah anderson's family. >>> legendary dick vandyke survives an accident. prince will criminal dwush william gushes about baby george. david beckham gets back to business and the marine gets the ncaa to bend. >>> good morning. i'm mara schiavocampo. we start in the west where it's man versus nature. firefighters report some progress in that massive growing wildfire in central idaho. the flames are threatening at least three communities, forcing thousands to flee. jay gray reports from near the fire line in haley, idaho. >> reporter: the fight against the beaver creek wildfire continues for a 13th day this morning in the idaho mountains. the massive blaze fanning out in several directions right now, pushed by strong winds and with no shortage of dried out brush for f
the heat, of course, over privacy after edward snowden leaked details of nsa snooping. and russia, of course, has given edward snowden temporary asylum keeping him out of the reach of american law enforcement. let's listen to a sound bite we have from president obama during his press conference yesterday. >> no, i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. the fact is that mr. snowden has been charged with three felon s felonies. if, in fact, he believes that what he did was right, then, like every american citizen, he can come here, appear before the court with a lawyer, and make his case. >> not a patriot, he said, but also admitting that perhaps the reaction and the changes to these programs are happening more swiftly because of the leaks that edward snowden did put out there. >> yeah. i mean, he said that we would get here at this point anyway, but probably not this soon. >> uh-huh. >>> next on "newsroom," the latest on the emotional custody battle between usher and his ex-wife. just days after their 5-year-old son nearly drowned. the great outdoors... ...and a great deal. thanks
that they recreated investigations to hide leads they got from the nsa. a new roiters report says the irs is involved, too. it has one of two dozen arguments part of the special operations. they take sensitive information and turns it into usable tips and leads. it was publishd in a manual used by irs agents. edward snowden says russian president vladmir putin will not cave to president obama. >> he has stood firm against intense pressure from our government. i have to believe he had continue to stand firm. >> speaking of pressure that is mounting on russia to ex draw tig -- extradite snowden to the united states. is the president being hypocritical? remember when he said this? >> the notion somehow not talking to countrys is punishment to them which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration is ridiculous. a oo he will be in saint peters burg but doesn't plan to meet one-on-one with putin. >> looking into the disappearance of a criminal investigator. sandra cope was last seen by her teenaged daughter who says cope went to follow up on a lead on a stolen dog. >> she may have met
nsa intercepts, domestic wiretaps, and informants to help dea agents launch criminal investigations of americans. instructedare then to re-create the investigative trail in order to conceal the origins of the evidence area reuters is reporting the dea has also provided classified intelligence obtained by the nsa and other sources to the internal revenue service to help in their investigations of americans. like at the dea, irs agents are then instructed to cover up how they obtained the tips. pakistan, u.s. state department has ordered most personnel to leave the consulate in lahore because of a threat to the mission. gunman in the pakistani city of of aa fired on the vehicle politician driving past worshipers leaving a mosque, killing nine people and wounding 27. attack came one day after suicide bombing attack in the same city killed three people at a policeman's funeral. three u.s. drone strikes killed at least 12 people in yemen on thursday. the united states has not carried out at least a drone strikes in yemen since july 27, killing 34 people, according to the associated press
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 146 (some duplicates have been removed)